#38 The Confessor of Littlefield: Farewell

Author’s note: this is the concluding installment of the serial novel, The Confessor of Littlefield. The story will be reset to chapter one and I will begin reposting as I work on illustrations and paintings to fill out the story. I will also complete the index page with individual chapter links for the 38 chapters….

#37 The Confessor of Littlefield: Ghosts in the Junkyard

Ghosts In the Junkyard At night Bill continued to write short stories. Ghosts In the Junkyard,” he called them. All seemed to involve characters engaged in a contest of will against an incontestable fate, as in the film noir movies he admired in the 1940s and 1950s. Drawing inspiration from Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio, and…

#36 The Confessor of Littlefield: Gestures

A few months passed before Bill saw Clara pull into the salvage yard again. She had a friend from Chicago to introduce to Bill. Vida was lean and defined, about 5 ft 7 and 140 pounds. His father was Chinese, his mother Mexican. He was in his early 30s, assertive when he spoke, and moved…

#35 The Confessor of Littlefield: The One Who Taught You Everything

If it weren’t for the devastating attacks on Christian prejudice by so many of Virgie’s friends Bill would’ve been tempted over the years to succumb to the admonishing Calvinist Christ of the Dymes or the sheer Lutheran faith of Rita Hapflik. The community he had known as a child in the 1940’s was mostly evangelical…

#34 The Confessor of Littlefield: Mellow

Mellow Bill’s horse was aging. Mellow was a chestnut quarter horse mare with a grumpy but affectionate disposition. Bill loved horses and through them found an outlet for his need to show tenderness. Mellow was about 5 years old when Dev first got her, a little more than a year after Bill went back to…

#32 The Confessor of Littlefield: In the Footsteps of Our Fathers

Bill was called to the scene of an auto accident late one unseasonably warm December afternoon in 1968, and when he returned after dark around 6:30 PM the big garage door was still open. He knew that John had stayed up the night before with a couple of fellow veterans playing poker, drinking and smoking…

#31 The Confessor of Littlefield: Dark Spots in the All Seeing Eye

After coming home from the war, John continued to strip cars despite the colostomy bag he now tucked in a pouch on his waist. Race car drivers from the county race track flocked to the salvage yard when they heard John was back home. They would’ve kept John busy rebuilding gears, suspensions, engines and drive…

#29 The Confessor of Littlefield: In the Service of Little Men

John advanced in the army corps through three years and became a second lieutenant in an army guerrilla training unit in VietNam, until he was discharged in September of 1963. When John came back from the fighting he wasn’t quite right, his mother confided to her friends. He rarely talked, answering only when spoken to….

#28 The Confessor of Littlefield: The Communist and the Evangelical

A year after Bill quit school to work as a farm hand full time Hiram asked him to help John out in the salvage yard on Sundays. John expostulated on world affairs and the opinions of pundits on the evening news, while Bill’s mind wandered on rhyming phonemes. Occasionally, Bill would listen enough to point…

#27 The Confessor of Littlefield: In the Headlights

A Drive In Theater was erected across the street from the salvage yard in the Spring of 1948, the same year the Hapflik’s moved to Littlefield. In the early 1950’s, on warm nights Bill would walk the mile and half to the Drive In and slip through a fence in the far back corner. After…